Imagine… You hold in your hands a tub of our peeled and sliced Frutifresh melon. You can’t wait to sink your teeth into it because you see the juicy melon, peeled and cut to a size that is ideal for poking and eating. But… wait! How about reflecting for a moment on what has happened to the parts of the melon that are not there? Where has its bark and seeds gone? How many kilos of this waste can we generate at Vicente Peris during the year and what happens to it?

There are many questions to which we have answers, because we have been working for years on the correct management of the waste we generate with our activity. Every waste, be it organic, cardboard, plastic or wood, has a dignified and environmentally friendly end, a process that valorizes the waste and integrates it into the so-called circular economy.

Let’s go back to the melon in your hands. You’re about to enjoy its flesh, but you know what, you’re not the only one who’s going to lick your lips with it. Margarita, who is a cow, is going to feast on its rind. And the seeds? The seeds have been sent since last year to the University of Castilla-La Mancha for a research in which we are collaborating and thanks to which functional (healthier) foods will be obtained.
thanks to which functional foods (healthier) will be obtained, replacing their saturated fats with the polyunsaturated and antioxidant oils of these seeds.
The saturated fats will be replaced by the polyunsaturated and antioxidant oils of these seeds.

At Peris we generate and properly manage 2 million tons of organic waste per year.

Management of organic waste from fruits and vegetables

Management of organic waste from fruits and vegetables

Finding a responsible and useful solution for each of the waste we generate is something we take to heart. And do not think that this is something simple, since in a year we are able to generate about 2 million kilos of waste from all the fruits and vegetables we work with in I, IV and V range: watermelon, melon, white celery, pumpkin, pomegranate, mango, pineapple, peas, beans, orange… All these wastes are mostly rinds, seeds and, in the case of white celery, stems and leaves that we eliminate during the preparation of some of the formats we prepare of this fantastic product.

Once removed, we store them in plastic bins, large-volume containers that we keep closed to prevent leakage of juices or leachates from the plant remains. In these containers we only pour vegetable waste suitable for livestock consumption, since, for example, we eliminate coconut bark or the crown of pineapples (their leaves) to prevent animals from choking on them. The bins generated in the fresh cut and pre-prepared convenience food plant are kept in cold storage rooms at less than 10 degrees Celsius, until they are sent and managed from our headquarters through the livestock farms or waste managers with whom we collaborate.

If we did not do this work of recovering waste to, in this case, feed livestock, it would end up in a landfill. Fortunately, since it is organic waste, it would be integrated into the soil and would not generate any environmental damage. However, we find much more sense in the fact that these remains have a useful purpose, which is what is called the valorization of by-products generated by the agri-food industry.

Waste from the agri-food industry managed for a useful purpose

Waste from the agri-food industry managed for a useful purpose

Other materials, such as cardboard, or especially plastic, can be more problematic if their management is not adequate, and therefore, in Vicente Peris we also deal with them in the most appropriate way possible. We will talk about this in future articles.

In the meantime, enjoy your tub of peeled and sliced melon, because Margarita must already be doing it with her rinds.